The Shoe Story, and Kiwi's Role In It

Hebu jitokeze, jionyeshe, simama, mbele ya watu. Kiwi hung”arisha, huboresha, hudumisha… *something something* Naenda kupata mng’aro wa kipekee…

Do you remember that Kiwi ad years ago that used to start like that? It takes me back to my primary school days. My dad taught my brothers and me how to polish our shoes. First you wipe them clean of all dust (or mud), then you let them dry naturally in the shade. When dry, you puff them with the brush, then apply Kiwi (and no other brand I’ve ever used since) evenly all round. Finally, the polishing part, the part where you make them shine until you can see your reflection! Even Rudisha said it, wakati mtu anapong’arisha viatu vyake, si viatu pekee vinavyong’ara (well, said with an Olympic champion’s accent!). Nevertheless, Rudisha cleans up well in a suit! And he has a lovely smile.

Rudisha with his gold medal. (Photo: Reuters)

I went to boarding school in my last few years of primary school and I always looked forward to the 4 o’clock bell announcing the end of lessons (or was it the 5 o’clock bell?). End of classes meant most kids left for games, but I was never an athletic type so I would change into slippers instead and sit on top of my metal box and shine my shoes for the following day. Although I never got the award for the neatest girl at the end of the term, I’d be sure to get one or two academic awards and my shining shoes would do me justice.

Fast track to my high school days and although the shining was much less vigorous, it was still there. These days, I hardly own any shoes that need polishing, except one pair for which I do those polishing booths in town once in a while.

Everyone can be defined by the shoes they wear. The toddler in those cute Bubblegummers, the nursery school kid with his first pair of leather shoes shined by his mother/elder siblings that show he’s cared for, the primary school kid who shines her own shoes so she can stand proud at parade the next day, the teenager with his ugly, brightly coloured Supras (I think they are called that) thinking he looks super cool, the lady in red with her black stilettos elegantly swaying to her car (or teetering dangerously to her stage), the gentleman in a suit with the well polished classy shoes…

A shoe can tell a story. A leather shoe can tell no story without Kiwi in it! It’s been around for years now, and with its consistent quality it will be for years to come and I hope to have the privilege of teaching my kids how to shine their first pair of leather shoes with Kiwi.

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    Thanks for sharing the post here. Keep up the good work. All the best.

  • pitzevans

    interesting memories

  • http://twitter.com/bobbui Bo

    Hakuna mg’aro kama wa kiwi :)